Cypress leaftier

Cypress leaftier -
  • Latin name: Epinotia subviridis Heinrich
  • French name: Lieuse du cyprès
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Tortricidae
Description

Distribution

British Columbia

This species occurs throughout south coastal British Columbia; it also occurs south to California.

Micro-habitat(s)

Twig, Needle

Damage, symptoms and biology

The cypress leaftier occasionally causes visible shoot dieback on ornamental Cupressaceae.

Mature larva up to 10 mm long. Head, unmarked brown. Body, reddish brown, dorsum of each abdominal segment marked with two pairs of dark spots (pinnacula).

This species overwinters as a small larva. Larvae resume feeding in March forming feeding shelters near shoot tips in which are incorporated frass, gnawed twigs and foliage. Pupation occurs in early June and adults emerge in July.

Canadian Forest Service Publications

Cypress leaftier

Diet and feeding behaviour

  • Phyllophagous : Feeds on the leaves of plants.
    • Leaftier: Ties two or more leaves together with silk threads, forming a tube in which to hide and feed.
  • Xylophagous : Feeds on woody tissues (wood).
    • Borer: Bores into and feeds on the woody and non-woody portions of plants.
    : Feeds on woody tissues (wood).
    • Borer: Bores into and feeds on the woody and non-woody portions of plants.
Information on host(s)

The principal hosts of the cypress leaftier are western redcedar and various ornamental cedar, cypress and juniper species.

Main host(s)

Cedars / arborvitae / thujas, Chinese Juniper, common juniper, cypress, eastern redcedar, grand fir, juniper, Rocky Mountain juniper, Rocky Mountain juniper, western redcedar, yellow-cedar

Photos
  • Cypress leaftier
  • Cypress leaftier
  • Cypress leaftier
  • Cypress leaftier
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