Amabilis fir

Silhouette - amabilis fir
  • Latin name: Abies amabilis (Dougl. Ex Loud.) Dougl. Ex Forbes
  • French name: Sapin gracieux
  • Synonym(s): Pacific silver fir
  • Taxonomic Serial Number: 181824
  • NA5 , C6
Description

Leaves

  • Needle and needle cross section - amabilis fir
  • Twig and needles - amabilis fir

Form

  • Tip notched
  • Needles on the lower surface and sides of the twig spreading horizontally and curved upward
  • On upper surface, needles shorter, appressed, grooved, and pointed forward
  • Odour of oranges when crushed
  • Resin ducts small, located near the lower surface

Length

  • 20–30 mm

Colour

  • Upper surface shiny dark green, often with a few white dots toward the tip
  • Several lines of white dots on lower surface

Buds

Form

  • Rounded
  • Resinous

Length

  • 3–7 mm

Colour

  • Dark bluish-brown

Twigs

  • Twig terminal - amabilis fir

Form

  • Stout, minutely hairy

Colour

  • Dark yellowish-brown to greyish-brown

Seed cones (mature)

  • Cone scale; outer surface with bract (left), inner surface with winged seed (right), winged seed inner surface (below) - amabilis fir

Form

  • Ovoid-conical

Length

  • 9–14 cm

Colour

  • Brown

Structure

  • Scales as wide as they are long
  • Bracts shorter than the scales, with shoulders sloping away from the broad base of a long wedge-shaped tip

Timing

  • Cones ripen in mid-August
  • Seeds shed a few weeks later

Seeds

Length

  • Seed 8–16 mm
  • Seed wing 25–40 mm

Bark

Form

  • Smooth
  • Becoming scaly and grooved at the base of mature trees

Colour

  • Light grey, blotched with white patches

Wood

Texture

  • Light, soft, weak

Colour

  • Creamy-white to yellowish-brown

Morphology

  • No distinct heartwood

Uses

  • Wood pulp, lumber

Size

Height

  • To 40 m, occasionally larger

Diameter

  • To 90 cm

Maximum age

  • 300 years

Tree form

  • Silhouette - amabilis fir

Forest-grown

Trunk

  • Slender

Crown

  • Slender, conical
  • Principal branches mostly horizontal
  • Lower ones drooping, persisting after they die

Root system

  • Moderately deep, wide-spreading

Habitat

Site

  • Variety of soils

Light tolerance

  • Very shade-tolerant

Associated species

  • Occasionally grows in pure stands, but more often mixed with Sitka spruce, western hemlock, Douglas-fir, and western redcedar

Range

Subalpine forests of western British Columbia and as far south as northern California

Insects and diseases

Insects and diseases that are found most frequently and/or that cause the most damage in our Canadian forests.

Photos
  • Amabilis fir
Distribution map
Distribution map - amabilis fir
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