Peachleaf willow

  • Latin name: Salix amygdaloides Andersson
  • French name: Saule à feuilles de pêcher
  • Taxonomic Serial Number: 22499
Description

Leaves

  • Leaf with detail of finely toothed margin - peachleaf willow

Form

  • Lance-shaped, thin
  • Tip long-pointed, base rounded and uneven
  • Midvein prominent
  • Young leaves sparsely hairy, becoming hairless
  • Stipules absent except on vigorous shoots

Length

  • 5–14 cm

Colour

  • Upper surface green
  • Lower surface whitish
  • Young leaves reddish

Margin

  • Finely toothed

Buds

Form

  • Ovoid, sharp-pointed
  • Pressed against the twig, closely spaced
  • Covered with a single scale
  • No true terminal bud; end bud originates as a lateral bud
  • Flower buds larger than leaf buds
  • Leaf scars V-shaped, with 3 vein scars
  • Stipule scars on either side

Length

  • Leaf buds 2–4 mm

Colour

  • Shiny yellowish-brown

Twigs

Form

  • Smooth, slender
  • Flexible, tough

Colour

  • Yellowish-brown becoming grey
  • Lenticels pale

Flowers

  • Pollen catkin - peachleaf willow
  • Seed catkin - peachleaf willow
  • Seed flower (left); deciduous bract (right) - peachleaf willow
  • Pollen flower - peachleaf willow

Form

  • Catkins loose, on leafy shoots
  • Pollen catkins’ flowers in whorls
  • Seed catkins long, loosely flowered

Length

  • Pollen catkins 3–6 cm
  • Seed catkins 4–9 cm

Structure

  • Dioecious

Floral timing

  • With the leaves

Fruits

  • Fruit capsule closed (left), open (right) - peachleaf willow

Length

  • Capsules 4–7 mm
  • Stalks 1–2 mm

Colour

  • Reddish or yellowish

Timing

  • Bracts shed before capsules ripen

Bark

Form

  • Irregularly furrowed with broad, flat, shaggy ridges

Colour

  • Reddish-brown, with age becoming greyish-brown

Size

Height

  • To 20 m
  • The tallest native willow in the Prairie provinces
  • Often with several leaning trunks in a clump

Diameter

  • Single trunks sometimes 40 cm

Tree form

Open-grown

Crown

  • Branches often curving upward, then arching over near the tip

Habitat

Site

  • Moist soil along rivers and lakes and in wooded swamps

Range

British Columbia to Quebec, and southward to the United States and Mexico

Insects and diseases

Insects and diseases that are found most frequently and/or that cause the most damage in our Canadian forests.

Distribution map
Distribution map - peachleaf willow
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