Garry oak

Silhouette - Garry oak
  • Latin name: Quercus garryana Dougl. ex Hook.
  • French name: Chêne de Garry
  • Synonym(s): Oregon white oak
  • Taxonomic Serial Number: 19340
Description

Leaves

  • Leaf - Garry oak

Form

  • Thick, stiff
  • 5–7 rounded lobes
  • Separated by deep, narrow notches
  • Larger lobes may be notched at the tip 
  • Upper surface appears pebbled
  • Lower surface hairy

Length

  • 7–10 cm

Colour

  • Upper surface shiny dark green
  • Lower surface dull yellowish-green
  • Hairs brown

Autumn colour

  • May turn red

Petiole

  • 1–3 cm long

Buds

  • Lateral bud and leaf scar - Garry oak

Form

  • Terminal bud elongated, pointed
  • Lateral buds diverging from the twig
  • Scales narrow, rather loose
  • Densely hairy

Length

  • Terminal bud 6–12 mm

Colour

  • Pale brown

Twigs

  • Winter twig - Garry oak

Form

  • Stout
  • Densely hairy in first season, becoming hairless

Colour

  • Becoming dark reddish-brown

Flowers

Form

  • Pollen flowers small
  • In many-flowered drooping catkins
  • Seed flowers small
  • Solitary or in few-flowered clusters (spikes)

Structure

  • Monoecious

Floral timing

  • With the leaves

Fruits

  • Acorn - Garry oak

Form

  • Acorns solitary or paired
  • On short stalks
  • Cup shallow, saucer-shaped, enclosing one-third of the acorn
  • Scales slightly thickened, hairy
  • Free at the tips
  • Do not form a marginal fringe

Length

  • Acorns 25–30 mm
  • Stalks up to 5 mm 

Structure

  • 1-seeded nut

Bark

Form

  • Scaly, with narrow, shallow furrows

Colour

  • Dark greyish-brown

Size

Height

  • To 20 m
  • Small trees
  • Shrubby on poor rocky sites

Diameter

  • To 150 cm

Maximum age

  • 200 years

Tree form

  • Silhouette - Garry oak

Forest-grown

Trunk

  • Short, stout
  • Often forked below 5 m

Crown

  • Broad, rounded
  • Composed of numerous twisted, knobby branches

Habitat

Site

  • Deep, moist, loamy soils
  • Often at forest edges on south-facing slopes
  • Dry rocky knolls
  • Seaside sites not subject to tidal flooding

Light tolerance

  • Intolerant of shade and competition

Associated species

  • In small pure stands or mixed with Douglas-fir and arbutus

Range

The only oak native to British Columbia
Coastal Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands
Scattered locations along the lower Fraser River

Other

Similar in appearance to English oak

Insects and diseases

Insects and diseases that are found most frequently and/or that cause the most damage in our Canadian forests.

Photos
  • Garry oak
  • Garry oak
  • Garry oak
Distribution map
Distribution map - Garry oak
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